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Test Prep GMAT Section 3 Verbal Ability Exam Actual Questions

The questions for GMAT Section 3 Verbal Ability were last updated at June 9, 2022.
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Topic 1 - Reading Comprehension Questions

Question #1 Topic 1

Read the passage carefully and then choose the best answer to each question. Answer the question based upon what is stated or implied in the reading passage.
In Ursula LeGuin’s short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," everyone in the city of Omelas is happy — everyone, that is, except the child who is kept locked in a basement closet. The child is left entirely alone and neglected except for occasional visits from the citizens of Omelas. They come at a certain age as a rite of initiation, to learn the secret of the happiness they enjoy. They come to learn that their happiness has a price: the suffering of an innocent child. In the end, most people stay in Omelas; but a few, unable to bear the fact that they are responsible for the suffering of that child, reject this utopia built upon a utilitarian morality.
Utilitarianism is an ethical theory based upon the belief that happiness is the ultimate good and that people should use happiness as the measure for determining right and wrong. For utilitarian, the right thing to do is that which will bring about the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest number of people. Furthermore, utilitarianism argues that the intention of peoples actions does not matter; only the consequences of their actions are morally relevant, because only the consequences determine how much happiness is produced.
Although many useful social policies and much legislation are founded on this "greatest good" philosophy, utilitarianism can be problematic as a basis for morality.
First, happiness is not so easy to quantify, and any measurement is bound to be subjective. Second, in a theory that treats everything except happiness as instrumentally rather than intrinsically valuable, anything or, more importantly, anyone can (and should) be treated as a means to an end, if it means greater happiness. This rejects the notion that human beings have their own intrinsic value. Further, utilitarianism puts the burden of the happiness of the masses on the suffering of the few. Is the happiness of many worth the suffering of a few? Why do those few deserve to suffer? Isnt this burden of suffering morally irresponsible? This is the dilemma so brilliantly illustrated in LeGuins story.
Which of the following best sums up the authors opinion of utilitarianism?

  • A. It is an ethical theory.
  • B. It is the ethical theory that people should all live by.
  • C. It is a useful but problematic ethical theory.
  • D. It does not adequately measure happiness.
  • E. It underestimates the intrinsic value of human beings.
Reveal Solution Hide Solution   Discussion  

Correct Answer: C 🗳️
The author is critical of utilitarianism, but she also includes evidence that it is a useful theory. LeGuins story, for example, shows how the sacrifice of one can create the happiness of many. The author also notes that "many useful social policies and much legislation are founded on" utilitarianism, demonstrating that it is a useful ethical theory. The word choice throughout also indicates that the author feels that this ethical theory has both positive and negative aspects. For example, she calls it "problematic," but not "wrongheaded" or "faulty." She calls the problem of the suffering of the few for the happiness of the many a "dilemma," not a
"flaw" or "failure." She asks questions rather than making statements about the immorality of utilitarian choices. Choice a is incorrect because it simply states a fact from the essay; it does not express an opinion. The author clearly states that "there are several serious problems with utilitarianism as a basis for morality," so choice b is incorrect. Although the statements in choices d and e are true and clearly stated in the text, these are specific criticisms of utilitarianism and do not sum up the authors opinion of this ethical theory.

Question #2 Topic 1

Read the passage carefully and then choose the best answer to each question. Answer the question based upon what is stated or implied in the reading passage.
In Ursula LeGuin’s short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," everyone in the city of Omelas is happy — everyone, that is, except the child who is kept locked in a basement closet. The child is left entirely alone and neglected except for occasional visits from the citizens of Omelas. They come at a certain age as a rite of initiation, to learn the secret of the happiness they enjoy. They come to learn that their happiness has a price: the suffering of an innocent child. In the end, most people stay in Omelas; but a few, unable to bear the fact that they are responsible for the suffering of that child, reject this utopia built upon a utilitarian morality.
Utilitarianism is an ethical theory based upon the belief that happiness is the ultimate good and that people should use happiness as the measure for determining right and wrong. For utilitarian, the right thing to do is that which will bring about the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest number of people. Furthermore, utilitarianism argues that the intention of peoples actions does not matter; only the consequences of their actions are morally relevant, because only the consequences determine how much happiness is produced.
Although many useful social policies and much legislation are founded on this "greatest good" philosophy, utilitarianism can be problematic as a basis for morality.
First, happiness is not so easy to quantify, and any measurement is bound to be subjective. Second, in a theory that treats everything except happiness as instrumentally rather than intrinsically valuable, anything or, more importantly, anyone can (and should) be treated as a means to an end, if it means greater happiness. This rejects the notion that human beings have their own intrinsic value. Further, utilitarianism puts the burden of the happiness of the masses on the suffering of the few. Is the happiness of many worth the suffering of a few? Why do those few deserve to suffer? Isnt this burden of suffering morally irresponsible? This is the dilemma so brilliantly illustrated in LeGuins story.
According to the passage, in utilitarianism

  • A. only intentions have moral significance.
  • B. consequences are important, but intentions are more important.
  • C. intentions and consequences are equally important.
  • D. intentions are important, but consequences are more important.
  • E. only consequences have moral significance.
Reveal Solution Hide Solution   Discussion  

Correct Answer: E 🗳️
In the second paragraph, the author states that "only the consequences of [people’s] actions are morally relevant, because only the consequences determine how much happiness is produced".

Question #3 Topic 1

Read the passage carefully and then choose the best answer to each question. Answer the question based upon what is stated or implied in the reading passage.
In Ursula LeGuin’s short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," everyone in the city of Omelas is happy — everyone, that is, except the child who is kept locked in a basement closet. The child is left entirely alone and neglected except for occasional visits from the citizens of Omelas. They come at a certain age as a rite of initiation, to learn the secret of the happiness they enjoy. They come to learn that their happiness has a price: the suffering of an innocent child. In the end, most people stay in Omelas; but a few, unable to bear the fact that they are responsible for the suffering of that child, reject this utopia built upon a utilitarian morality.
Utilitarianism is an ethical theory based upon the belief that happiness is the ultimate good and that people should use happiness as the measure for determining right and wrong. For utilitarian, the right thing to do is that which will bring about the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest number of people. Furthermore, utilitarianism argues that the intention of peoples actions does not matter; only the consequences of their actions are morally relevant, because only the consequences determine how much happiness is produced.
Although many useful social policies and much legislation are founded on this "greatest good" philosophy, utilitarianism can be problematic as a basis for morality.
First, happiness is not so easy to quantify, and any measurement is bound to be subjective. Second, in a theory that treats everything except happiness as instrumentally rather than intrinsically valuable, anything or, more importantly, anyone can (and should) be treated as a means to an end, if it means greater happiness. This rejects the notion that human beings have their own intrinsic value. Further, utilitarianism puts the burden of the happiness of the masses on the suffering of the few. Is the happiness of many worth the suffering of a few? Why do those few deserve to suffer? Isnt this burden of suffering morally irresponsible? This is the dilemma so brilliantly illustrated in LeGuins story.
The author summarizes LeGuins story primarily to

  • A. show how good the story is.
  • B. get readers interested in the story.
  • C. illustrates the power of words.
  • D. illustrates the central problem with utilitarianism.
  • E. illustrates a utilitarian utopia.
Reveal Solution Hide Solution   Discussion  

Correct Answer: D 🗳️
LeGuins story illustrates the problem with utilitarianism by describing how one person (the child) lives in misery so that others can be happy. The author explains that "utilitarianism puts the burden of the happiness of the masses on the suffering of the few" and then states that this problem is "so brilliantly illustrated in
LeGuin’s story."Choice is incorrect because the author does not comment on or make any inferences about the overall quality of the story; she only comments on it in relation to its demonstration of the dilemma of utilitarianism.Readers may be interested in the story after reading this passage (choice b), but again, the purpose of including the story is made evident by the last sentence in the passage. The author does not quote directly from the story, and she is clearly not summarizing it to illustrate the power of words, so choice c is incorrect.

Question #4 Topic 1

Read the passage carefully and then choose the best answer to each question. Answer the question based upon what is stated or implied in the reading passage.
In Ursula LeGuin’s short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," everyone in the city of Omelas is happy — everyone, that is, except the child who is kept locked in a basement closet. The child is left entirely alone and neglected except for occasional visits from the citizens of Omelas. They come at a certain age as a rite of initiation, to learn the secret of the happiness they enjoy. They come to learn that their happiness has a price: the suffering of an innocent child. In the end, most people stay in Omelas; but a few, unable to bear the fact that they are responsible for the suffering of that child, reject this utopia built upon a utilitarian morality.
Utilitarianism is an ethical theory based upon the belief that happiness is the ultimate good and that people should use happiness as the measure for determining right and wrong. For utilitarian, the right thing to do is that which will bring about the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest number of people. Furthermore, utilitarianism argues that the intention of peoples actions does not matter; only the consequences of their actions are morally relevant, because only the consequences determine how much happiness is produced.
Although many useful social policies and much legislation are founded on this "greatest good" philosophy, utilitarianism can be problematic as a basis for morality.
First, happiness is not so easy to quantify, and any measurement is bound to be subjective. Second, in a theory that treats everything except happiness as instrumentally rather than intrinsically valuable, anything or, more importantly, anyone can (and should) be treated as a means to an end, if it means greater happiness. This rejects the notion that human beings have their own intrinsic value. Further, utilitarianism puts the burden of the happiness of the masses on the suffering of the few. Is the happiness of many worth the suffering of a few? Why do those few deserve to suffer? Isnt this burden of suffering morally irresponsible? This is the dilemma so brilliantly illustrated in LeGuins story.
From the passage, it can be inferred that the author

  • A. may use utilitarianism occasionally but not as a guiding moral principle.
  • B. would never use utilitarianism to make a decision about what is right or wrong.
  • C. uses utilitarianism regularly to make moral decisions.
  • D. believes utilitarianism is a good basis for social policy.
  • E. thinks most people do not really understand utilitarianism.
Reveal Solution Hide Solution   Discussion  

Correct Answer: A 🗳️
The author is critical of utilitarianism and admits it has several problems, but she does not reject it as an ethical theory. In fact, she concedes that it is useful in creating social policies and legislation. Therefore, the most logical inference is that she may use utilitarianism occasionally but not as a guiding moral principle.
Choices b and c are therefore incorrect. Choice d is incorrect because nothing in the passage indicates how she feels about utilitarianism as a basis for social policy. The passage does not state that she believes most people do not really understand utilitarianism, so choice e is incorrect.

Question #5 Topic 1

Read the passage carefully and then choose the best answer to each question. Answer the question based upon what is stated or implied in the reading passage.
In Ursula LeGuin’s short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," everyone in the city of Omelas is happy — everyone, that is, except the child who is kept locked in a basement closet. The child is left entirely alone and neglected except for occasional visits from the citizens of Omelas. They come at a certain age as a rite of initiation, to learn the secret of the happiness they enjoy. They come to learn that their happiness has a price: the suffering of an innocent child. In the end, most people stay in Omelas; but a few, unable to bear the fact that they are responsible for the suffering of that child, reject this utopia built upon a utilitarian morality.
Utilitarianism is an ethical theory based upon the belief that happiness is the ultimate good and that people should use happiness as the measure for determining right and wrong. For utilitarian, the right thing to do is that which will bring about the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest number of people. Furthermore, utilitarianism argues that the intention of peoples actions does not matter; only the consequences of their actions are morally relevant, because only the consequences determine how much happiness is produced.
Although many useful social policies and much legislation are founded on this "greatest good" philosophy, utilitarianism can be problematic as a basis for morality.
First, happiness is not so easy to quantify, and any measurement is bound to be subjective. Second, in a theory that treats everything except happiness as instrumentally rather than intrinsically valuable, anything or, more importantly, anyone can (and should) be treated as a means to an end, if it means greater happiness. This rejects the notion that human beings have their own intrinsic value. Further, utilitarianism puts the burden of the happiness of the masses on the suffering of the few. Is the happiness of many worth the suffering of a few? Why do those few deserve to suffer? Isnt this burden of suffering morally irresponsible? This is the dilemma so brilliantly illustrated in LeGuins story.
From the authors summary of LeGuins story, the reader can infer that

  • A. most people in Omelas are utilitarian.
  • B. most people in Omelas reject utilitarianism.
  • C. everyone in Omelas is happy.
  • D. the child willingly sacrifices himself for others.
  • E. LeGuin is a popular science-fiction writer.
Reveal Solution Hide Solution   Discussion  

Correct Answer: A 🗳️
The author states that "most people stay in Omelas" after they have visited the child. This indicates that they understand and have accepted the utilitarian nature of their society. Only a few walk away and reject the society, so choice b is incorrect. The summary clearly states that everyone except the child and the ones who are "unable to bear the fact that they are responsible for the suffering of that child" are happy, so choice c is incorrect. No evidence indicates that the child willingly sacrifices himself for others (choice d). The passage makes no reference to LeGuins popularity or success as a science-fiction writer, so choice e is incorrect.

Question #6 Topic 1

Read the passage carefully and then choose the best answer to each question. Answer the question based upon what is stated or implied in the reading passage.
In Ursula LeGuin’s short story "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas," everyone in the city of Omelas is happy — everyone, that is, except the child who is kept locked in a basement closet. The child is left entirely alone and neglected except for occasional visits from the citizens of Omelas. They come at a certain age as a rite of initiation, to learn the secret of the happiness they enjoy. They come to learn that their happiness has a price: the suffering of an innocent child. In the end, most people stay in Omelas; but a few, unable to bear the fact that they are responsible for the suffering of that child, reject this utopia built upon a utilitarian morality.
Utilitarianism is an ethical theory based upon the belief that happiness is the ultimate good and that people should use happiness as the measure for determining right and wrong. For utilitarian, the right thing to do is that which will bring about the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest number of people. Furthermore, utilitarianism argues that the intention of peoples actions does not matter; only the consequences of their actions are morally relevant, because only the consequences determine how much happiness is produced.
Although many useful social policies and much legislation are founded on this "greatest good" philosophy, utilitarianism can be problematic as a basis for morality.
First, happiness is not so easy to quantify, and any measurement is bound to be subjective. Second, in a theory that treats everything except happiness as instrumentally rather than intrinsically valuable, anything or, more importantly, anyone can (and should) be treated as a means to an end, if it means greater happiness. This rejects the notion that human beings have their own intrinsic value. Further, utilitarianism puts the burden of the happiness of the masses on the suffering of the few. Is the happiness of many worth the suffering of a few? Why do those few deserve to suffer? Isnt this burden of suffering morally irresponsible? This is the dilemma so brilliantly illustrated in LeGuins story.
Utilitarianism could best be expressed in which of the following formulas?

X _ action -
Y _ consequences that create happiness
Z _ consequences that create unhappiness

  • A. Do X if Y _ Z.
  • B. Do X if Y _ Z.
  • C. Do X if Y _ Z.
  • D. Do X if Y _ Z.
  • E. Do X if Y _ Z.
Reveal Solution Hide Solution   Discussion  

Correct Answer: D 🗳️
The basic principle of utilitarianism as explained in the passage is that people should do "that which will bring about the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest number of people." Therefore, humans should choose actions that will have more happy consequences (Y) than unhappy consequences (Z); Y must be greater than (_) Z.

Question #7 Topic 1

Read each passage carefully and then choose the best answer to each question. Answer the questions based upon what is stated or implied in the reading passage.
For many years, there has been much hand-wringing over the fate of Social Security once the baby boomers reach retirement age. Baby boomers, people born between 1946 and 1964, represent the largest single sustained growth of population in the history of the United States. It is the sheer enormity of this generation that has had economists worried as retirement beckons. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2020, an estimated 80,000,000 Americans will have reached or surpassed the conventional age of retirement. With so many boomers retiring and drawing benefits but no longer paying into Social Security, many fear that the
Social Security fund itself could go bankrupt.
However, a study released by the American Association for Retired Persons (AARP) that examined baby boomers plans for retirement found that for the most part, this generation is not expected to adhere to the conventional retirement scheme, a fact that may please the worriers in Washington, DC.
In its survey, the AARP broke baby boomers into different categories based on their financial standing, degree of preparedness for retirement, and optimism toward the future. The AARP found that of all groups surveyed, only 13% planned to stop working altogether once they reached retirement age; the remaining
87% planned to continue working for pay. The reasons to continue working varied among the different groups. For some, the plan to continue working is a financial decision. Between 25% and 44% of respondents reported they are not financially prepared to retire and will therefore continue working past retirement age. For the remainder of those planning to work past their mid to late 60s, the decision is based on long-held goals to start a business and/or the desire to stay active in their industry or community.
Eventually, most baby boomers will need to stop working as they progress into their 70s, 80s, and beyond. But with such large numbers planning to continue working, thereby continuing to pay into the Social Security fund, perhaps Social Security will be able to withstand the end of the baby boom and continue to be a safety net for future generations.
Which of the following titles would be most appropriate for this passage?

  • A. The AARP and Social Security
  • B. Baby Boomers Bankrupt Social Security
  • C. Baby Boomers Will Work for PaybeyondRetirement
  • D. Worries about Social Security May Be Unfounded
  • E. Economists Fear Baby Boomers’ Impact on Social Security
Reveal Solution Hide Solution   Discussion  

Correct Answer: D 🗳️
This choice offers the best title for the passage, which explains why the "worriers in Washington" may have nothing to fear after all. Choice a is incorrect because the passage is not about the relationship between the AARP and Social Security or the AARPs position on Social Security issues. Choice b is incorrect because the passage actually argues the opposite: that most baby boomers will continue to pay into Social Security long after the traditional age of retirement. Choice c is true, but it is just one specific fact cited within the passage to support the main idea. Choice e is also true, but the passage explains why the economists fears are unfounded.

Question #8 Topic 1

Read each passage carefully and then choose the best answer to each question. Answer the questions based upon what is stated or implied in the reading passage.
For many years, there has been much hand-wringing over the fate of Social Security once the baby boomers reach retirement age. Baby boomers, people born between 1946 and 1964, represent the largest single sustained growth of population in the history of the United States. It is the sheer enormity of this generation that has had economists worried as retirement beckons. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2020, an estimated 80,000,000 Americans will have reached or surpassed the conventional age of retirement. With so many boomers retiring and drawing benefits but no longer paying into Social Security, many fear that the
Social Security fund itself could go bankrupt.
However, a study released by the American Association for Retired Persons (AARP) that examined baby boomers plans for retirement found that for the most part, this generation is not expected to adhere to the conventional retirement scheme, a fact that may please the worriers in Washington, DC.
In its survey, the AARP broke baby boomers into different categories based on their financial standing, degree of preparedness for retirement, and optimism toward the future. The AARP found that of all groups surveyed, only 13% planned to stop working altogether once they reached retirement age; the remaining
87% planned to continue working for pay. The reasons to continue working varied among the different groups. For some, the plan to continue working is a financial decision. Between 25% and 44% of respondents reported they are not financially prepared to retire and will therefore continue working past retirement age. For the remainder of those planning to work past their mid to late 60s, the decision is based on long-held goals to start a business and/or the desire to stay active in their industry or community.
Eventually, most baby boomers will need to stop working as they progress into their 70s, 80s, and beyond. But with such large numbers planning to continue working, thereby continuing to pay into the Social Security fund, perhaps Social Security will be able to withstand the end of the baby boom and continue to be a safety net for future generations.
According to the author, baby boomers are not likely to bankrupt the Social Security fund primarily because

  • A. the government has raised the official age for retirement.
  • B. most baby boomers are financially prepared for retirement.
  • C. most baby boomers plan to work past retirement age.
  • D. most baby boomers are active in their communities.
  • E. most baby boomers will not need supplemental income.
Reveal Solution Hide Solution   Discussion  

Correct Answer: C 🗳️
The AARP study cited in the third paragraph reveals that 87% of the baby boomers surveyed "planned to continue working for pay" once they reach retirement age. The passage does not state that the government raised the retirement age (choice a). Choices b and e are incorrect because the AARP survey also notes that "between 25% and 44% of respondents reported they are not financially prepared to retire," which means they will need supplemental income. A desire to remain active in their community (choice d) is one of the reasons many baby boomers will continue to work, but it is the fact that they will continue to work (not why they will continue to work) that allays the fear of a bankrupt system.

Question #9 Topic 1

Read each passage carefully and then choose the best answer to each question. Answer the questions based upon what is stated or implied in the reading passage.
For many years, there has been much hand-wringing over the fate of Social Security once the baby boomers reach retirement age. Baby boomers, people born between 1946 and 1964, represent the largest single sustained growth of population in the history of the United States. It is the sheer enormity of this generation that has had economists worried as retirement beckons. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2020, an estimated 80,000,000 Americans will have reached or surpassed the conventional age of retirement. With so many boomers retiring and drawing benefits but no longer paying into Social Security, many fear that the
Social Security fund itself could go bankrupt.
However, a study released by the American Association for Retired Persons (AARP) that examined baby boomers plans for retirement found that for the most part, this generation is not expected to adhere to the conventional retirement scheme, a fact that may please the worriers in Washington, DC.
In its survey, the AARP broke baby boomers into different categories based on their financial standing, degree of preparedness for retirement, and optimism toward the future. The AARP found that of all groups surveyed, only 13% planned to stop working altogether once they reached retirement age; the remaining
87% planned to continue working for pay. The reasons to continue working varied among the different groups. For some, the plan to continue working is a financial decision. Between 25% and 44% of respondents reported they are not financially prepared to retire and will therefore continue working past retirement age. For the remainder of those planning to work past their mid to late 60s, the decision is based on long-held goals to start a business and/or the desire to stay active in their industry or community.
Eventually, most baby boomers will need to stop working as they progress into their 70s, 80s, and beyond. But with such large numbers planning to continue working, thereby continuing to pay into the Social Security fund, perhaps Social Security will be able to withstand the end of the baby boom and continue to be a safety net for future generations.
The author cites statistics from the AARP survey primarily to

  • A. supports the assertion that baby boomers are the largest group of retirees in U.S. history.
  • B. show that baby boomers will not retire en masse as feared.
  • C. suggests that better financial planning is needed for the elderly.
  • D. show how optimistic baby boomers are about their future.
  • E. show the correlation between retirement age and optimism.
Reveal Solution Hide Solution   Discussion  

Correct Answer: B 🗳️
The survey statistics demonstrate that most baby boomers will keep working, so the Social Security system will not encounter a sudden massive strain as baby boomers reach the retirement age. Choice a is incorrect because although the number of baby boomers is cited (80,000,000), no other figure is cited in comparison. One statistic from the survey suggests that many baby boomers have not planned well for retirement (choice c), but several other statistics are also cited, so this cannot be the main purpose.
The passage states that the survey was designed in part to measure baby boomers optimism (choice d), but the passage does not cite results of questions in that category. Choice e is incorrect for the same reason.

Question #10 Topic 1

Read each passage carefully and then choose the best answer to each question. Answer the questions based upon what is stated or implied in the reading passage.
For many years, there has been much hand-wringing over the fate of Social Security once the baby boomers reach retirement age. Baby boomers, people born between 1946 and 1964, represent the largest single sustained growth of population in the history of the United States. It is the sheer enormity of this generation that has had economists worried as retirement beckons. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2020, an estimated 80,000,000 Americans will have reached or surpassed the conventional age of retirement. With so many boomers retiring and drawing benefits but no longer paying into Social Security, many fear that the
Social Security fund itself could go bankrupt.
However, a study released by the American Association for Retired Persons (AARP) that examined baby boomers plans for retirement found that for the most part, this generation is not expected to adhere to the conventional retirement scheme, a fact that may please the worriers in Washington, DC.
In its survey, the AARP broke baby boomers into different categories based on their financial standing, degree of preparedness for retirement, and optimism toward the future. The AARP found that of all groups surveyed, only 13% planned to stop working altogether once they reached retirement age; the remaining
87% planned to continue working for pay. The reasons to continue working varied among the different groups. For some, the plan to continue working is a financial decision. Between 25% and 44% of respondents reported they are not financially prepared to retire and will therefore continue working past retirement age. For the remainder of those planning to work past their mid to late 60s, the decision is based on long-held goals to start a business and/or the desire to stay active in their industry or community.
Eventually, most baby boomers will need to stop working as they progress into their 70s, 80s, and beyond. But with such large numbers planning to continue working, thereby continuing to pay into the Social Security fund, perhaps Social Security will be able to withstand the end of the baby boom and continue to be a safety net for future generations.
It can be inferred from the AARP survey results that

  • A. many baby boomers do not have adequate savings.
  • B. many baby boomers are afraid of retirement.
  • C. most baby boomers are unaware of the actual cost of retirement.
  • D. few baby boomers are realistic about their retirement goals.
  • E. politicians do not understand the baby boom generation.
Reveal Solution Hide Solution   Discussion  

Correct Answer: A 🗳️
The survey found that a quarter to nearly a half of all respondents planned to keep working because "they are not financially prepared to retire." This suggests that many baby boomers do not have adequate savings. Nothing in the survey results suggests a fear of retirement (choice b). Also, nothing in the passage suggests that baby boomers are unaware of the cost of retirement (choice c).
The passage does not assess how realistic baby boomers’ goals are (choice d) and makes no reference to politicians (choice e) other than the vague "worriers in
Washington," a group that could include economists, lobbyists, and many other kinds of people.

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